Peripheral Neuropathy

A serious problem that affects not just the patient, but also the lives of their loved ones

stepping on pins

What is Peripheral Neuropathy?

Peripheral neuropathy refers to the physical conditions that result when nerves that carry messages to and from the brain and spinal cord, from and to the rest of the body, are damaged or diseased. Peripheral nerves connects the brain and spinal cord to the muscles, skin, and internal organs via an intricate network. 8% of the population in the United States (40million Americans!) has some form of peripheral neuropathy. 

Neuropathy is a serious problem that affects not just the patient, but also the lives of their loved ones. This is because once a person starts to lose function in the legs and hands, their activities of daily living and livlihood are affected and then those responsibilities tend to fall upon their loved ones.

Causes of Peripheral Neuropathy

As peripheral neuropathy progresses and nerve fibers are further damaged, large and small diameter nerves; patients will develop “positive” neuropathy signs. Even though there is nothing positive in the diagnosis of this serious illness.

Primary Reasons Include:

  • Diabetes/Pre-diabetic
  • Poor Circulation
  • Toxic Exposure (Chemotherapy)
  • Herniated Disk or Spinal Stenosis
  • Trauma
  • Autoimmune or Kidney/Liver Diseases
  • Infections (Viral or Bacterial)
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Thyroid Conditions
  • Pharmaceutical Medications
Standing in hospital room with walker

Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy

Many patients experience a gradual decline of balance, loss of reflexes, stiffness in the feet, inability to perceive sensory perceptions. These sensations may decline so slowly that the patient may not notice the symptoms occurring for years until something happens or it just becomes unbearable. 

Pain in the Hands or Feet
Tingling or Pins & Needles
Burning or Electric-Like Shocks
Numbness, Weakness or Loss of Grip
Loss of Balance
Difficulty Sleeping due to Symptoms

One reason this number is steadily increasing is because of the rising wave of diagnosing diabetes as the primary cause. Up to 60%of diabetics can eventually develop these debilitating symptoms.

As peripheral neuropathy progresses and nerve fibers are further damaged, large and small diameter nerves; patients will develop “positive” neuropathy signs. Even though there is nothing positive in the diagnosis of this serious illness.